Thrill of the Hunt #61

October 31, 2017




Hello friends, it's time for another Thrill of the Hunt! I've got a few recent thrift store purchases that I'd like to share with you today that hail from places far and wide -- like St. Louis, Missouri, and one that comes all the way from Gien, France! So let's get started, shall we?

Gien France Filet Bleu pattern creamer Marie-Pierre Coitard

Of course I have to start with the French item first! Isn't it lovely? It's a creamer made in the Loire Valley of Gien, France by a company called Faiencerie de Gien. The simple blue pattern is called "Filet Bleu" by Marie-Pierre Boitard.

Gien France Filet Bleu pattern creamer Marie-Pierre Coitard

Gien France Filet Bleu pattern creamer Marie-Pierre Coitard

I think the lines of the piece and the simple blue pattern are just gorgeous.

Gien France Filet Bleu pattern creamer Marie-Pierre Coitard

Gien France Filet Bleu pattern creamer Marie-Pierre Coitard

This pattern is all hand painted. I made the mistake of assuming the piece was porcelain. I assumed wrong. According to the Gien website it's actually "faience":

Faience is a fine, porous earthenware product that is tin-glazed and then fired repeatedly at a temperature of 900°C. The shaped vessels are then dipped in a liquid glaze suspension made of sand, potash, tin, lead and water, after which they are then handpainted. 

Gien France Filet Bleu pattern creamer Marie-Pierre Coitard

Gien France Filet Bleu pattern creamer Marie-Pierre Coitard


makers mark Gien France Filet Bleu pattern creamer Marie-Pierre Coitard

According to my research on the maker's mark, this particular mark was used from 1971 to 1984. So the piece can be anywhere from 33 to 46 years old. Either way, it's definitely vintage. I'm not sure of it's value, but I've seen a teapot in this pattern listed on Ebay for $250.00, and the exact same creamer listed for $80.00.

MCM Art Deco pink gazelle statue gold accent

Now for something completely different! No maker's mark on this baby, but I'm guessing she was made in the U.S. (or Japan) somewhere between 1940-1950.

MCM Art Deco pink gazelle statue gold accent

I originally thought it was a deer, but upon further research turns out it's a gazelle. It's all in the ears --who knew?

MCM Art Deco pink gazelle statue gold accent


MCM Art Deco pink gazelle statue gold accent

MCM Art Deco pink gazelle statue gold accent

MCM Art Deco pink gazelle statue gold accent

MCM Art Deco pink gazelle statue gold accent

I found only two of these for sale in my research. Estimated value: $15.00-$25.00.

Merle Norman 1974 white pitcher foaming bath oil

When I first saw this I assumed it was a creamer of some sort. Wrong.

Merle Norman 1974 white pitcher foaming bath oil

Merle Norman 1974 white pitcher foaming bath oil

Merle Norman 1974 white pitcher foaming bath oil

This lovely little porcelain container is actually a Merle Norman foaming bath oil pitcher! It originally came with a matching bowl and stopper but they must have gone by the wayside.

Merle Norman 1974 white pitcher foaming bath oil

I guess Merle Norman foaming bath oil was a "thing" in 1974.  Estimated value: $5.00.

Vintage Vess Billion Bubble Beverage bottle soda pop

So now -- for the sixty-four thousand dollar question: When it comes to soft drinks, do you say soda or pop? The label on this vintage Vess bottle skirts the issue entirely by calling itself the "Billion Bubble Beverage". (Being a dyed-in-the-wool East coast girl myself, I say soda!!!)

Vintage Vess Billion Bubble Beverage bottle soda pop

I wonder what their variety of popular flavors included back when this bottle was manufactured? I'm not sure of the year, but I believe it was in the 1950's.

Vintage Vess Billion Bubble Beverage bottle soda pop

Vess was founded in 1916 in St. Louis, MO and is still operating today. Estimated value: $5-$10. This and all of the above thrifty finds will eventually make their way into my Etsy shop, Vintage Farmhouse Love. Drop me a note in the comments or email me directly if you're interested in purchasing any of them!


Well, that's it until next time, friends! 

I hope you enjoyed reading 
Thrill of the Hunt #61.
And thanks so much for spending 
time with me today!

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Leave a Comment!

Dottie said...

Great finds today! I love that pink gazelle for some reason. So cool!

Cecilia said...

Nice finds! The soda bottle made me smile - billon bubble beverages! 😊 Too cute.

Cecilia

rush said...

In my family, who live in western PA, they said pop. So, being from that stock, I said pop. My wife's family, on the other hand, hailed from the Philadelphia area, or eastern PA. They apparently said soda. Now, I say soda. I think we should all call our soda pop a billion bubble beverage. It sounds more fun!

Linda @ Itsy Bits And Pieces said...

Lots of fun finds...the French piece is lovely!

Old Time Cindy said...

Love that little creamer. Oh, I say pop.

VintageSouthernPicks said...

I'm from the South, so everything is a "coke," no matter what brand it is. Southerners never say "soda" or "pop."
Love the finds, esp the "deer."

My thrift store addiction said...

Oh what a find on that French pitcher! Love the pink gazelle too ;)

Kathy said...

The French creamer is lovely. I like the bath oil pitcher, too. I would put a gold ribbon with a jingle bell on the gazelle and include her as an honorary reindeer for the Christmas season! In Maine and NH, it is soda. Sometimes soda pop. Coke is Coke, Diet Pepsi is Diet Pepsi and sweet tea has only been in restaurants 1-2 years!

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